reddragdiva: (geek)
[personal profile] reddragdiva

Now using Xubuntu 11.10 (Xfce 4.8). Installing GNOME apps as I need them, as long as they don't pull in large chunks of GNOME. Nautilus 3.2 is way more stable in Xfce than 2.32 was in Unityfied GNOME2.

It's noticeably more responsive on my aging Mini 9. There appears to be a blissful absence of background services sopping up CPU. Xfce mostly just stays out my way.

I had to install gvfs-backends. I installed Nautilus as my file manager, which also appears much more stable in Xfce. Totem instead of Parole. (Yeah, if there's one thing free software needs, it's another media player with a nonsequitur name.) There are occasional jarring lacks: the absence of any clear way to edit the menus (the wiki instructions don't actually work, nor lxmed, and alacarte pulls in 50MB of GNOME rubbish just to edit a menu); having to go command-line to make capslock a control key.

The forum is quite good. Even if the actual answer to questions is often "that's not implemented, feel free to write it."

The project is tiny and lacking in developers; if the devs are smart, they can take advantage of the GNOME3/Unity car crashes to boost their numbers of power users who are actually capable of fixing problems — when Linux kernel developers start posting rants about how they can't do actual work in GNOME3/Unity, that's a powerful untapped userbase. Perhaps an easy hacks list like the one for LibreOffice?

Anyone else trying Xfce or LXDE or whatever? What papercuts have you hit?

(also posted to Facebook and G+)

(no subject)

Date: 2011-10-31 03:07 pm (UTC)
mstevens: (Default)
From: [personal profile] mstevens
I've been trying xfce in the form of xubuntu too.

I've been having trouble finding a nice theme.

I had trouble with sound as some dependency somewhere pulled in roaraudio, which sound. After I managed to identify the problem removing it made audio work again.

I've never wanted to edit the menus.

Setting up keyboard shortcuts is harder, but possible.

I should actually go back to xubuntu, I switched to unity while I was trying to fix the sound problem, but I'm still hating it.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-10-31 03:13 pm (UTC)
mstevens: (Default)
From: [personal profile] mstevens
It was specifically the roaraudio package, which seems to grab your sound device and not let go.

Was fine once I removed that.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-10-31 03:21 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rogerbw.myopenid.com
I've recently replaced my laptop and also decided to do things the proper way - NetworkManager and the rest of Gnome were the first to go. But I'm sticking with fvwm, because I know and like it.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 12:08 am (UTC)
ext_51145: (Default)
From: [identity profile] andrewhickey.info
I've used XFCE as my default desktop for about two years now. Only problem I've ever hit with it is that multiple monitors require all sorts of hackery with xorg.conf (so I use GNOME at work where I have multiple monitors). Other than that, it Just Works.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-17 05:14 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] liam-on-linux.livejournal.com
Yup, I found that trying it on my elderly Thinkpad recently. PITA.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 12:31 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] thefon.net
I'm planning to do the same, when I get time.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 12:59 am (UTC)
tyggerjai: (Default)
From: [personal profile] tyggerjai
I'm running xubuntu with XFCE, have been for a few years now. Loving it. Multiple desktops were fairly straightforward with the Nvidia config tool, may not help if you're not using Nvidia, of course :) On the EeePC I've gone even more minimal and have CrunchBang with Openbox, which I'm also loving, but I'm not sure about it as a main work machine setup. I'll be trying it in January when I get free time and need another workstation, so I'll let you know.

The only papercut I've found is session management - I have it set up (in theory) to log in directly as me on boot. Sometimes, I'll switch it on, go away to make coffee, and come back to find the session chooser box, even though I've told it a few times not to bother and always open the default session. More rarely, I've come back to find a GDM login window, which is annoying.

But mostly it's just solid.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 01:07 am (UTC)
tyggerjai: (Default)
From: [personal profile] tyggerjai
s/desktops/monitors/

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 03:23 am (UTC)
ideological_cuddle: (Default)
From: [personal profile] ideological_cuddle
I'm presently poking at Mint DE with XFCE in a VM. On the plus side, it ships with a stock Oracle JRE, so all the stuff that gets real finicky about which JRE it has should work.

I'm a bit cautious about using it as a primary work environment though as I really do need a screen magnifier, which will mean convincing Compiz to work on it. Which may be easy, or may not be, hard to tell until I try it on a real machine rather than a VM.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 06:20 am (UTC)
tyggerjai: (Default)
From: [personal profile] tyggerjai
YEah. So today, XFCE seems to have randomly stopped actually handling mouse clicks. Or passing them through to underlying windows. Huzzah. Thanks.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 12:53 pm (UTC)
tyggerjai: (Default)
From: [personal profile] tyggerjai
And upgrading to Xubuntu 11.10 seems to have totally hosed the desktop settings I actually had - wallpaper replaced by horrible color, desktop icons twice the size. Both of which seem to be unchangable. All software probably sucks. I'm going to install crunchbang.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 12:57 pm (UTC)
tyggerjai: (Default)
From: [personal profile] tyggerjai
Yeah, well, fuck em, I'm switching distros. Can one actually remove Unity? Why am I getting the Onboard keyboard crap even in XFCE?

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 01:06 pm (UTC)
tyggerjai: (Default)
From: [personal profile] tyggerjai
As far as I can tell, Onboard is a touchscreen keyboard utility. Which might be useful on a tablet, but is just annoying on a desktop. Removing the default Unity apparently sucks in untiy 2D! Huzzah. And removing that installs a whole lot of other crap. Seriously, what the hell?

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-18 10:31 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] liam-on-linux.livejournal.com
Yes, it installs Unity-2D, because that's the fallback GUI if there is no 3D acceleration available. For example, if you don't have working 3D drivers installed yet. So it's a prerequisite; it *needs* to be there or you might not be able to log in or get to a desktop. Seems perfectly fair & reasonable to me.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-17 05:17 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] liam-on-linux.livejournal.com
It did used to be bad, a few years ago. The install I'm typing on started out as 9.10 and has been through every release since, with only 2 fixable hitches. It does seem to be getting better.

I was particularly impressed going from 10.10 to 11.04: it picked up my heavily-customised GNOME 2 desktop, with the top panel vertical and the bottom panel removed and replaced with hand-installed ADeskBar - and migrated all my app-launcher icons to the Unity launcher. I was surprised, but happy.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 09:36 pm (UTC)
mstevens: (Default)
From: [personal profile] mstevens
I've been having another problem - excessive and unwanted virtual keyboards.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-01 09:54 pm (UTC)
mstevens: (Default)
From: [personal profile] mstevens
It was previously tainted with unity. It's still installed in fact.

Tentative theory is that it relates to whether you enable the GNOME services.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-02 06:32 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Looks like Xubuntu isn't the best way to try Xfce, from your comments... Xfce works fine under Arch Linux; but then, fixing things is a normal workflow under Arch (not that things break often, but it happens.)

To edit menues you're supposed to use Alacarte, AFAIK. I directly edit .desktop files, myself.

Not sure which distro is the easiest/best for Xfce. I've been slightly disapointed with Linux Mint Xfce, it doesn't want to update anymore with some weird error and might be a little bloated for my netbook.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-04 05:19 am (UTC)
tyggerjai: (Default)
From: [personal profile] tyggerjai
So I did put Crunchbang on a workstation and am loving the hell out of it. I don't know what you want out of the box in a window manager - it doesn't do desktops or docks by default, but it has a bunch of useful keybindings, and seems very tweakable.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-17 05:19 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] liam-on-linux.livejournal.com
It does do multiple desktops! 2 by default. They are the large boxes in the tint2 panel at the bottom. The left box contains apps on your left vdesktop, the right one - oh, go on, guess.

Personally, I remove tint2 and install fbpanel instead, which works more or less how I like a panel to. Very vaguely Win95-like, easily customised. I believe fbpanel's the basis for the panel/taskbar in LXDE, too, which indicates that it's not just me. ;¬)

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-18 04:18 am (UTC)
tyggerjai: (Default)
From: [personal profile] tyggerjai
Well, keyword overloading. It does "multiple workspaces" by default. But none of those workspaces will, by default, present the contents of your "Desktop" in the sense of clickable icons, folders, trash can, etc.

(no subject)

Date: 2011-11-18 10:34 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] liam-on-linux.livejournal.com
I am confused. This *is* Crunchbang we are discussing, yes? Because if so, it doesn't *have* any of that stuff. It *has* no desktop icons, folders, trash can, etc. At least not as I remember. So, no, the virtual desktops don't contain them; *none* of the desktops contain them.

It does have virtual desktops, though, in the sense of multiple workspaces. What other sense of the phrase is there?

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